LG details the G Watch R


 

 

Rather than wait until the IFA trade show in Berlin next week, LG has decided to shed some light on its upcoming G Watch R by detailing its specs. This is nothing new for the Korean company as it has been showing off products before their official launch all year. The G Watch R is LG’s first round faced wearable and could be the first such smartwatch to hit the market.

LG is boasting that the G Watch R is “the world’s first watch-style wearable device to feature a circular Plastic OLED (P-OLED) display and utilizes 100 percent of its watch face.” That is a definite knock at Motorola’s Moto 360, the original round faced wearable that has a black bar at the bottom that stops it being 100% round (or should that be 360?). The G Watch R sports a 1.3-inch full circle P-OLED display, a 1.2GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon 400 paired with 512MB of RAM, and 4GB of internal storage. Also added to the mix is a 410mAh battery and IP67 waterproofing that lets the watch function in up to one meter depths and from 30 minutes. Of course, the G Watch R will come running Google’s Android Wear platform and will have many of the standards we have to expect with smartwatches. That includes voice recognition, a heart rate monitor, and notifications for missed calls and messages, upcoming meetings, events, and local weather forecasts. LG has also included a number of its own fitness and health apps, as is the norm with wearable products. Of course, the biggest talking point about the G Watch R is its circular design, making it one of only two (the Moto 360 the other) to offer this classic watch look. LG says the device is encased in stainless steel and has interchangeable 22mm calfskin leather straps. Dr. Jong-seok Park, president and CEO of the LG Electronics Mobile Communications explained why the company is introducing a new smartwatch just two months after rolling out the original G Watch. “Wearables are also accessories and consumers will want more than one to choose from. So we wanted to complement the modern design of the original G Watch with the classic look of the G Watch R. Customers can’t go wrong with either device.”

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LG details the G Watch R


 

 

Rather than wait until the IFA trade show in Berlin next week, LG has decided to shed some light on its upcoming G Watch R by detailing its specs. This is nothing new for the Korean company as it has been showing off products before their official launch all year. The G Watch R is LG’s first round faced wearable and could be the first such smartwatch to hit the market.

LG is boasting that the G Watch R is “the world’s first watch-style wearable device to feature a circular Plastic OLED (P-OLED) display and utilizes 100 percent of its watch face.” That is a definite knock at Motorola’s Moto 360, the original round faced wearable that has a black bar at the bottom that stops it being 100% round (or should that be 360?). The G Watch R sports a 1.3-inch full circle P-OLED display, a 1.2GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon 400 paired with 512MB of RAM, and 4GB of internal storage. Also added to the mix is a 410mAh battery and IP67 waterproofing that lets the watch function in up to one meter depths and from 30 minutes. Of course, the G Watch R will come running Google’s Android Wear platform and will have many of the standards we have to expect with smartwatches. That includes voice recognition, a heart rate monitor, and notifications for missed calls and messages, upcoming meetings, events, and local weather forecasts. LG has also included a number of its own fitness and health apps, as is the norm with wearable products. Of course, the biggest talking point about the G Watch R is its circular design, making it one of only two (the Moto 360 the other) to offer this classic watch look. LG says the device is encased in stainless steel and has interchangeable 22mm calfskin leather straps. Dr. Jong-seok Park, president and CEO of the LG Electronics Mobile Communications explained why the company is introducing a new smartwatch just two months after rolling out the original G Watch. “Wearables are also accessories and consumers will want more than one to choose from. So we wanted to complement the modern design of the original G Watch with the classic look of the G Watch R. Customers can’t go wrong with either device.”

China planning its own mobile platform


China wants to take the fight to Android
China wants to take the fight to Android

Just about every brand wants to make it big in China, except for the Chinese ones who are big there and want to have success everywhere else. Every company from Microsoft to Apple and from Sony to Samsung wants to crack the Chinese market because the rewards are astronomical. This goes for Mobile platforms too, with Apple (iOS) and Google (Android) dominating the scene in China, especially the latter.

Even Microsoft sees China has a huge potentially huge market for its struggling Windows Phone, and we were thinking today that China is constantly being invaded. Clearly tired of having its market descended upon by a slew of Android devices, the country is planning its own mobile software, and is even planning a PC software to rival Windows. It is believed that the mobile platform will be ready for launch within 3 to 5 years and the project comprises 13 software companies with 80 research units all committed to giving China its own platform competitor. The country has not said whether it will make the platform available outside of China, but for some reason we doubt it. So, should Android and iOS be worried? We think so because history has proven that Chinese people buy a lot of Chinese smartphones and tablets. If those products have the Chinese OS as opposed to say Android, Google?s growth in the country will be stifled. Ni Guangnan from the Chinese Academy of Engineering, who has been developing the software said: “At present, China’s mobile operating system developers include more than a dozen companies, but they cannot be said to be based on independent intellectual property rights, using Android customisation,” Ni Guangnan said. “You must change the past approach, instead of copying the previous model integrate the resources accumulated in the past with a state-run unified operating system.”
Read more at http://www.mobileburn.com/23356/news/china-planning-its-own-mobile-platform#FS2qk4Uieu3LKYGg.99

WordPress – to feed


The wearable market is a nascent one, we keep being told that it will explode to be worth billions upon billions of dollars within a few years. However, that has not yet really happened as smart watches have failed to capture the public imagination, but they did enjoy a mini explosion over the first half of this year although some perspective is in order. http://local.qoo.ly/kqq

Sony, Xperia Z3 and beyond


Sony
The unknown tablet and SmartWatch

Sony suffered a catastrophic leak last week when its upcoming Xperia Z3 smartphone flagship was entirely laid bare by a regulatory body. The specs, dimensions, and design of the device were completely exposed, leaving the company with an IFA launch event that would now be a little de ja vu like. However, perhaps the Japanese company has a few more surprises up its sleeve, so here?s the IFA rumour roundup for Sony.

Xperia Z3

We will start with the Xperia Z3, although this is more of a confirmation than it is a rumour collection. The device is landing at IFA next week and it will be only an incremental improvement over the current Xperia Z2 flagship in terms of design and specs. However, Sony has done enough by the looks of it to keep its core range up to speed with current flagships while the company waits for next year and a more dramatic overhaul with the Xperia Z4.

Xperia Z3 variations

The Z3 proper may be totally out in the open, but there is still plenty to discuss regarding Sony’s Xperia flagship variants. There could be a few of them too, including a rumoured Xperia Z3 Compact, a sequel to the Z2 Compact and another flagship bothering small screen device. While no Z2 Compact has ever been released, Sony has been known to skip model numbers, but either way, we are expecting this to be launched at IFA next week.

An outside possibility is an Xperia Z3 phablet, the Z3 X, a handset that would crank up screen size but would probably maintain the general specs from the flagship handset. This is far more unlikely for next week as some reports point to Sony releasing an even higher spec’d large screen phone nearer the end of the year.

There is also a very strong possibility that two new slates will be launched by the Japanese company, and if they do not land at IFA they are not far away. The Xperia Z3 Tablet will be the sequel to the very good Xperia Z2 Tablet and would lead Sony’s slates as a flagship. However, rumours recently have also said that the company is working on an Xperia Z3 Tablet Compact, a device that will follow the ethos of the smartphone Compact by keeping the specs from the flagship but toning down the screen size. This would be Sony’s first true small form factor slate, and it got more real today as Sony posted an image on Facebook showing a small slate being used in a pool.

New SmartWatch Also showing up in that tablet image (you can check it out above) was what looks to be a new wearable. Of course, Sony was one of the first to the wearable party and is the company that can actually call its device the SmartWatch. The SmartWatch 2 was released during the summer of 2013, so it is very much in need of an update, especially with rival companies now entering the market left, right, and center. An announcement about this at IFA in Berlin would not come as a shock.

Kogan’s Agora 4G arrives with Moto G baiting specs and price


Very good budget devices are becoming more common, but the market is still a growing one and when we think of the best affordable handsets a few select names spring to mind. Chief among those is Motorola’s Moto G smartphone, a handset that packs a bunch of cool specs, a nice price tag, and has recently had a bump to include LTE. However, Australian company Kogan reckons it can offer a better deal the Motorola with a similarly designed and spec’d smartphone.

The Kogan Agora 4G looks an awful lot like the Moto G, while it packs much of the same specs (such as a quad core processor), but bests the G in some aspects too. For a start, the Agora gets a 5-inch panel instead of a 4.5-inch screen on the Moto G, whether that is for the better or not depends on your preference. Elsewhere the handset gets an 8 megapixel rear camera and a larger 2,500mAh battery, while as the name suggests it ships with 4G LTE.

The Moto G costs around $270 (£199) for the LTE version (the original G is somewhat cheaper if you are willing to lose the 4G), but the Agora 4G can be yours with a bigger screen and LTE for $219 (£149). A good deal then for sure, but good enough to make you want to ignore the well-received Moto G?

We have used a previous Kogan device before, the Agora HD to be exact, and while it was a decent effort we found the take on Android a little muddy and the camera shaky. We do not expect that those aspects have been improved for the 4G, but more than that we doubt many would risk losing Motorola’s close ties to Android and the obvious advantages of using a device made by a major brand.

Sure, that makes us a little sad as we would love to see smaller brands get more coverage, but ultimately the Moto G is still the best bet for a budget smartphone.