Genatest blog


Very distant galaxies have surprisingly little dark matter, the invisible stuff thought to make up the bulk of matter in the universe, new observations suggest.

Stars in the outer regions of some far-off galaxies move more slowly than stars closer to the center, indicating a lack of dark matter, astronomer Reinhard Genzel and colleagues report online March 15 in Nature. If confirmed, the result could lead astronomers to reconsider the role dark matter played in early galaxy evolution and might also offer clues to how nearby elliptical galaxies evolved

Anesthesia for youngsters is a tricky calculation


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If your young child is facing ear tubes, an MRI or even extensive dental work, you’ve probably got a lot of concerns. One of them may be about whether the drugs used to render your child briefly unconscious can permanently harm his brain. Here’s the frustrating answer: No one knows.

“It’s a tough conundrum for parents of kids who need procedures,” says pediatric anesthesiologist Mary Ellen McCann, a pediatric anesthesiologist at Boston Children’s Hospital. “Everything has risks and benefits,” but in this case, the decision to go ahead with surgery is made more difficult by an incomplete understanding of anesthesia’s risks for babies and young children. Some studies suggest that single, short exposures to anesthesia aren’t dangerous. Still, scientists and doctors say that we desperately need more data before we really understand what anesthesia does to developing brains.

It helps to know this nonanswer comes with a lot of baggage, a sign that a lot of very smart and committed people are trying to answer the question. In December, the FDA issued a drug safety communication about anesthetics that sounded alarming, beginning with a warning that “repeated or lengthy use of general anesthetic and sedation drugs during surgeries or procedures in children younger than 3 years or in pregnant women during their third trimester may affect the development of children’s brains.” FDA recommended more conversations between parents and doctors, in the hopes of delaying surgeries that can safely wait, and the amount of anesthesia exposure in this potentially vulnerable population.

 

Read more https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/growth-curve/anesthesia-youngsters-tricky-calculation

Google Pixel 2 might not have a headphone jack


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Despite highlighting the headphone port and taking a slight stab at Apple in adverts for the original Pixel and Pixel XL, it looks like Google might ditch the 3.5mm port for the Pixel 2.

An internal Google document seen by 9to5Google says as much, and although the site hasn’t shared the document itself, as doing so would put the source at risk, it’s emphasized that “the language used presents the removal of the jack as a matter of fact.”

So it sounds like an open-and-shut case, except it’s not quite. The information comes second hand from a single source, and even if it is accurate we’re likely a long way off the launch of the Pixel 2, with October looking most likely, so it’s always possible that Google could change its mind.

Could go either way

As such we wouldn’t count on it happening, but we also wouldn’t rule it out. Apple’s iPhone 7 wasn’t the first to ditch the 3.5mm port (the Moto Z among others got there first) and others are likely to follow, so we wouldn’t rule out the Pixel 2 being one of them.

If that sounds like a downgrade, well, in a sense it is, but it could free up space for new and improved components, like a bigger battery, or just a smaller handset.

And the Pixel 2 is shaping up to be a big upgrade in other areas, with rumors pointing to a waterproof build along with an improved chipset and camera, though it may also come with a higher price, so you’d better get saving.

http://www.techradar.com/news/google-pixel-2-might-not-have-a-headphone-jack

 

Samsung Galaxy S8 Edge


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The Samsung Galaxy S7 Edge is for our money the best phone you can buy right now, coupling the sheer power of the Samsung Galaxy S7 with a bigger battery, a more eye-catching design and genuinely useful edge screen features.

But there’s no such thing as a perfect phone, so there are still improvements  we’d like to see and will hopefully get with the Samsung Galaxy S8 Edge – or, as it may be called, the Samsung Galaxy S8 Plus.

With that in mind we’ve created a wish list for Samsung’s next curvy flagship, along with rumors and predictions of what it might include and when we might see it.

 

read more http://www.techradar.com/news/phone-and-communications/mobile-phones/samsung-galaxy-s8-edge-1318837