Randy Couture, a legend in the sport of mixed martial arts and rising film star, has agreed to a multi-year creative partnership with Spike TV. The deal includes multiple non-scripted projects, two of which have been greenlit to air.

“We are thrilled to partner with such an emerging star in entertainment and an absolute icon in the sport of mixed martial arts,” said Sharon Levy, Executive Vice President, Original Series, Spike TV.

The upcoming greenlit projects include:

Fight Master: Bellator MMA – Couture joins some of the biggest names in the sport of mixed martial arts as coaches and trainers for the new reality series, premiering this summer. Couture, Greg Jackson, Frank Shamrock, and Joe Warren will helm four separate fight camps for 32 up-and-coming fighters looking to fight their way into the Bellator tournament and a $100,000 cash prize. Spike will telecast 10 one-hour episodes of “Fight Master: Bellator MMA.” Two of television’s most acclaimed producers, eight-time Emmy® Award winner Bertram van Munster and Elise Doganieri of Profiles Television Productions, the visionaries behind “The Amazing Race,” serve as Executive Producers.

http://www.mmanews.com/news/90907

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AT&T, T-Mobile, and Sprint have confirmed that they will carry the just announced HTC One, the latest Android phone and the first to feature the all new Sense. The HTC One will launch in 80 markets beginning this spring. The phone will launch in March 2013 on AT&T, T-Mobile, and Sprint networks in the U.S. The HTC One will ship as an all-aluminum body with silver or black coating. Customers who pre-order the device this month can trade-in their existing phone for $100 toward purchase.

An Operating System in the Cloud: TransOS Could Displace Conventional Desktop Operating Systems


Computer users are familiar to different degrees with the operating system that gets their machines up and running, whether that is the Microsoft Windows, Apple Mac, Linux, ChromeOS or other operating system. The OS handles the links between hardware, the CPU, memory, hard drive, peripherals such as printers and cameras as well as the components that connect the computer to the Internet, critically it also allows the user to run the various bits of software and applications they need, such as their email programs, web browsers, word processors, spreadsheets and games.

While, operating systems seem firmly entrenched in the personal computer and their files, documents, movies, sounds and images, sit deep within the hard drive. Traditionally, software too is stored on the same hard drive for quick access to the programs a user needs at any given time. However, there is a growing movement that is taking the applications off the personal hard drive and putting them “in the cloud.”

 

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121009111944.htm

IE10 coming to Windows 7 sometime, maybe


Microsoft takes great pains to ensure that each new version of Windows remains backward compatible with older applications. But if Internet Explorer is any indication, writing a modern application for Windows 8 that still runs on older platforms is a lot harder than it sounds.

Each preview release of Windows 8 shipped with two builds of Internet Explorer 10 – one for the desktop and one for the new, touch-centric Start Screen – and early-access users of the Release to Manufacture (RTM) version of Windows 8 have had the final IE10 code since August.

When users of earlier versions of Windows will get their hands on Redmond’s latest browser, on the other hand, remains unclear.

According to a blog post issued on Wednesday, Windows 7 users will be able to download a version of IE10 in mid-November, but it will only be a preview release, and Microsoft still has not committed to any timeline for when a production-ready version will become available.

This won’t be the first time Windows 7 users have been given a sneak peek at the new browser, either. Microsoft last offered a preview version of IE10 for the older OS in June 2011. At the time, it described the early build as a “platform preview” aimed at getting web developers accustomed to the latest HTML5 technologies.

But maintaining that momentum wasn’t much of a priority, it seems, because there’s been nary a peep from the IE group about anything but Windows 8 since then. Even the latest announcement commits to nothing, other than that “final availability [will] follow as we collect developer and customer feedback.”

Here at El Reg‘s California aerie, this strikes us as a little odd. It would be one thing if Microsoft wouldn’t commit to offering IE10 on Windows XP; that OS is nearing the end of its support lifecycle anyway. But by most accounts, Windows 8’s desktop mode is almost 100 per cent compatible with applications built for Windows 7. What’s so special about IE10 that it can’t be made to work with the older OS, now that the final code is in the can?

Meanwhile, Google, Mozilla, and other IE competitors are hard at work building new versions of their browsers that integrate with Windows 8’s new features while still remaining compatible with Windows 7 and earlier. If Microsoft doesn’t plan to offer a production-ready version of IE10 for older operating systems until months after Windows 8 ships, some customers will inevitably jump ship.

To its credit, Microsoft has designed its latest browser for faster performance and better compliance with web standards, including the latest HTML5 and JavaScript APIs. But it has always – somewhat inexplicably – tried to tie the latest version of IE to the latest version of Windows, a practice that seems to be continuing with IE10 and Windows 8.

Redmond says it will offer its latest browser for older versions of Windows in due time. For now, however, it seems the only way Microsoft will supply you with a modern browser that complies with the latest open web standards is if you agree to upgrade to its newest proprietary OS. There’s a certain irony in that.

Microsoft Surface ad targets preppy, Glee-watching youngsters


Is it an Apple advert, a commercial for insurance, or an episode of Glee? No, it’s the first Surface commercial from Microsoft.

Hot on the heels of Microsoft’s Windows 8 ad – which seemed to bury the tablet and emphasise the traditional PC – Microsoft’s latest ad flogs its own hardware: the Windows 8-based Surface.

The ad is shot on a sun-kissed California campus among the traditionally Apple-happy student body. There’s lots of snapping and clicking – very much in vogue among Don-Draper hopefuls – body-popping plus formation jumping and twirling by kids in starched whites and pressed plaid to prove Microsoft’s Windows-8 Ultrabook is fresh.

There’s a single pair of senior citizens to show “it’s there if you want it gramps”, but the grey-dollar isn’t really Microsoft’s core demographic on this thing.

Move over mouse wrinklies, the kids wanna touch.

The ad is brighter and fresher than the pitch for Windows 8 on the PC, as Microsoft tries to differentiate Surface and versions of Windows 8.

Surface was unveiled by Microsoft in June as the company’s first own-branded PC. Surface goes on sale on 26 October in the US, the same date as the general launch of Windows 8.

There will be two devices, and here’s where it starts to get confusing for potential consumers who are used to one idea of Windows, if they even notice what’s running.

There will be a 676g ARM-powered Surface tablet running the version of Windows 8 for tablets, called Windows RT. This is 9.3mm thick. There is also a 909g Intel machine running Windows Pro – 13.5mm thick – which will also run on PCs, laptops, Ultrabooks and dockable tabs. This machine features an Intel Core processor. Both Surfaces will be come in 32GB and 64GB flavours and feature a 10.6-inch HD display.

The important details of battery life and price have not been revealed. Also, Surface won’t be available worldwide – it’ll be available at Microsoft’s US stores and select online locations. More details on all of these are expected at the launch later this month.

Windows 8 ads hit US screens: Death Metal, exploding laptops


Microsoft’s Windows 8 TV ads have started running in the US.

Microsoft started running the spots during peak-time viewing for US sports audiences on Sunday, just 12 days before the launch date of the Windows 8 OS on 26 October. Pre-orders have been open since Friday.

The ad pushes touchscreen PCs hard – showing off only one actual tablet-tablet.

We see PCs with keyboards and touchable screens from Lenovo and Acer plus one tablet, which could be a dockable screen or a pure-tablet – it’s not clear.

If you watched the opening of the Summer Olympics and Paralympics then you’ll recognise the ad’s opening: the countdown using numbers from daily life.

The first few seconds feature an exploding laptop. We get it, Microsoft.

Everything’s wrapped in a template made familiar by Apple with its launch of the iPad and iPhone: a short, catchy music track and fast images of product.

Microsoft’s track of choice: The Eagles of Death Metal offering I Only Want You.

We close on a Microsoft ads staple: a young child, a delightfully impish poppet living in a Boden-Ikea showroom photoshoot. She is the future and so, too, is Windows 8, we’re told. The glossy ad is also without a doubt trying to convince the recalcitrant typers and clickers who make up Windows core user group that the new operating system is “so easy a child can use it”.

As we know, Microsoft is facing a watershed moment here: it needs to introduce touch – both on PC and the new tablets – to the consumer body of Windows PC users, without alienating those who’ve become accustomed to keyboard and mouse.

The ad is part of a $300m campaign awarded by Microsoft to Burger King and Virgin Atlantic promo shop Crispin Porter + Bogusky.

So far, the Windows 8 interface has divided developers. Some have said they hate the Metro UI, which to their minds forces touch at all costs at the expense of the traditional desktop, while other devs have given the thumbs up to Metro and the downloadable apps. The former spirit is on display in this spoof.

Office 2013 hits RTM, will ship starting in November


Microsoft has put the finishing touches on Office 2013, paving the way for the latest version of Redmond’s flagship productivity suite to reach general availability in the first quarter of 2013.

An early preview of Office 2013 has been available for download since July, but that trial version lacked some features, including promised touch-friendly apps for Windows 8. With the announcement of the Release to Manufacturing (RTM) build, Redmond has signaled that the suite is now feature-complete and ready to ship through various distribution channels.

“This is the most ambitious release of Office we’ve ever done,” Kirk Koenigsbauer, corporate VP of Microsoft’s Office Division, wrote in a blog post on Thursday. “We are proud to achieve this milestone and are eager to deliver this exciting release to our customers.”

Of course, some of those customers will take delivery sooner than others. As is generally the case, subscribers to the Microsoft Developer Network (MSDN) or Redmond’s TechNet program for IT professionals will get first crack at the final Office code, which should hit Microsoft’s download servers sometime in mid-November.

Current Volume Licensing customers who are enrolled in Microsoft’s Software Assurance program should get access at around the same time, while new Volume Licensing customers will be able to sign up beginning on December 1.

Retail customers may be left waiting until as late as March – the exact ship date for the boxed version of Office 2013 is as yet unspecified. But retailers will be pleased to hear, at least, that they won’t be stuck with lots of unsold copies of Office 2010 while customers wait for the new version to hit the channel. Beginning on October 19, anyone who buys Office 2010 will automatically be eligible for a free upgrade to Office 2013 once it hits general availability.

That might not be as good a deal as it sounds, though. Microsoft has been aggressively promoting its Office 365 subscription program as an alternative to the perpetual-licensing model it has offered in the past. In addition to the full suite of Office applications, Office 365 customers get access to bonus cloud services and additional features not available to buyers of the boxed version of the suite.

Unfortunately, it wasn’t immediately clear when Office 365 customers would get access to the new versions of the Office apps.

“We will begin rolling out new capabilities to Office 365 Enterprise customers in our next service update, starting in November through general availability,” Koenigsbauer wrote – but he neglected to explain just what this meant, or when non-enterprise Office 365 customers could expect similar upgrades.

When contacted for clarification, Microsoft reps told El Reg, “We don’t have specifics to offer at this time on what Office 365 subscribers will receive. Please stay tuned for more specifics on general availability dates and other Office launch news.”